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John Sturges Personal Life & Family, Capricorn - 𝐉𝐨𝐡𝐧 𝐒𝐭𝐮𝐫𝐠𝐞𝐬 Biography
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Dorothy Lynn BrooksKatherine Helena Soules
John Eliot Sturges
Oak Park, Illinois, United States
Male
Reginald G. R. Carne
Grace Delafield Sturges
Capricorn
Oak Park, Illinois, United States
82
San Luis Obispo, California, United States
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Who is John Sturges?

undefined - John SturgesJohn Sturges

John Eliot Sturges was an American film director known for his westerns and the taut war movies. Commencing his film career in Hollywood in the early 1930s as an editor he went on to direct several training films and documentaries for the United States Army Air Forces during the ‘Second World War’. It was only post the war that he began directing mainstream films that included some classics like ‘Bad Day at Black Rock’, ‘Ice Station Zebra’, ‘The Magnificent Seven’, ‘Gunfight at the O.K. Corral’ and ‘The Great Escape’. The latter made an entry to the 3rd Moscow International Film Festival. His remarkable use of the widescreen Cinema Scope format in the suspense drama ‘Bad Day at Black Rock’ fetched him an ‘Academy Award’ nomination for Best Director. He also received nominations as Best Director from the ‘Directors Guild of America’ apart from a Palme d'Or from the ‘Cannes Film Festival’ for the film. His adventure drama ‘The Old Man and the Sea’ won the Best Foreign Language Film at the ‘Blue Ribbon Awards’ in Japan. In 1970 he received the ‘Golden Eddie’ Filmmaker of the Year award from the ‘American Cinema Editors’. The ‘Motion Picture & Television Fund’ conferred him with the ‘Golden Boot Award’ for his significant contribution over the years to the genre of Westerns.

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John Sturges Childhood & Early Life

He was born John Eliot Crane on January 3, 1910, in Oak Park, Illinois, US as the third child and second son of Reginald G. R. Carne and his wife Grace Delafield Sturges.

His English-born father was a real estate developer and banker who relocated with family to Southern California and established the Bank of Ojai when John was only two-year-old.

When John was around five-year-old his father’s alcoholism led to domestic problems that finally resulted in divorce of their parents following which his mother shifted to a small house in Santa Monica with the children.

Thereafter he and his siblings were raised by his mother. John later adopted his mother’s family name, which she reclaimed back after divorce, and used it all through his adult life.

Amidst the financial hurdles that the mother and her children faced, John Sturges remained content with outdoor activities that he enjoyed all through his growing years, which included shooting his BB gun, riding ostriches, building wireless receivers and racing soapboxes.

The family relocated to Berkeley, California in 1923 where he attended the Berkeley High School. While at high school he participated in plays portraying characters like the King Tut’s mummy and a pilgrim.

After receiving a football scholarship he attended the ‘Marin Junior College’ (presently ‘College of Marin’) where he majored in science.

Around 1930-31 he worked at the Tamalpais Theatre in San Anselmo as a stage manager to earn a living. He relocated to Los Angeles in 1931.

He attended Santa Monica City College where he studied engineering and during such time got engaged in several odd jobs like pumping gases and painting to sustain himself.

John Sturges Career

With the help of his brother Sturges Carne, who was working as art director in the RKO Studios, Sturges joined RKO in 1932 as assistant art director in the blueprint and art departments.

In 1934 he helped Robert Edmond Jones to bring three-strip Technicolor at RKO and the eventual success of films like ‘The Garden of Allah’ and ‘Becky Sharp’ led to his promotion as colour consultant.

He then worked as an apprentice in the studio’s editing department for four years. Moving forward he stepped as second unit director of his mentor, director George Stevens’ adventure film ‘Gunga Din’ (1939) that became a huge success.

The films ‘They Knew What They Wanted’ (1940) and ‘Tom, Dick and Harry’ (1941) both directed by Garson Kanin saw him working as the prime editor.

He directed around 45 documentary films for the U.S. Army Air Corps and intelligence that were based in California, Culver City, Dayton and Ohio during the ‘Second World War’ when he served as a Captain in the Army. The documentaries were shown to the troops and among these the most notable was ‘Thunderbolt’ (1945), a 43 minutes film that he made along with director William Wyler. This colour classic that was released in theatres after two years earned him a Bronze Star.

His debut in Hollywood as a director happened when he joined ‘Columbia Pictures’ with a weekly remuneration of $300. He was delegated to direct a number of B-movies.

His initial directorial ventures included the 1946 films ‘Alias Mr. Twilight’, ‘The Man Who Dared, Shadowed’; the 1947 films ‘Keeper of the Bees’ and ‘For the Love of Rusty’; and the 1949 film ‘The Walking Hills’.

After his stint with ‘Columbia Pictures’, Sturges signed with ‘Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer’ Studios Inc (‘MGM’), the famous American media company, in November 1949. Within two years he worked in seven films for the studio that included crime drama, ‘Mystery Street’ (1950); drama film ‘Right Cross’ (1950); a biopic ‘The Magnificent Yankee’ (1950); the film noir ‘The People Against O’Hara’ (1951) based on a novel by Eleazar Lipsky, starring Spencer Tracy; and the drama film ‘The Girl in White’ (1952).

The 1953 Anscocolor western film ‘Escape from Fort Bravo’ that garnered a profit of $104,000 furthered his reputation as one of the prominent action directors of Hollywood.

However after being behind the camera for so many years his real breakthrough came with the 1955 classic thriller ‘Bad Day at Black Rock’ where he reteamed with Tracy. The suspense drama that also starred Robert Ryan was not only acclaimed by the critics but also proved to be a smashing success at the box office garnering a profit of $947,000. It earned three ‘Academy Awards’ nominations including that of Best Director, the only such nomination that Sturges received in his entire career.

He moved on with films like ‘Underwater!’ (1955), ‘The Scarlet Coat’ (1955) and ‘Backlash’ (1956), however he was not quite happy with the interference of the studio which led him to work as a freelancer.

His next major hit was the 1957 film with the ‘Paramount Pictures’ titled ‘Gunfight at the O.K. Corral’, which was based on a real event that occurred on October 26, 1881. The film that starred Kirk Douglas as Doc Holliday and Burt Lancaster as Wyatt Earp garnered $4.7 million during its first run and after it was re-released it made a whooping $6 million. It received two ‘Academy Awards’ nominations, one for film editing and the other for sound recording. A sequel of a sort of the film was made by Sturges after a decade in 1967 that was titled ‘Hours of the Gun’ in which Jason Robards starred as Holliday and James Garner as Earp.

His other notable films included ‘The Magnificent Seven’ (1960), ‘The Great Escape’ (1963), ‘Ice Station Zebra’ (an all-male cast film, 1968), ‘Joe Kidd’ (1972) and ‘The Eagle Has Landed’ (1976).

John Sturges Personal Life & Legacy

In 1945 he married Dorothy Lynn Brooks, a secretary at Warner Bros. The couple had two children, a son, Michael Eliot Sturges and a daughter, Deborah Lynn Sturges Wyle. The couple later divorced.

He got married for a second time to Katherine Helena Soules, his fishing partner in 1984.

He suffered from chronic emphysema and on August 18, 1992, at the age of 82 years, he succumbed to a heart attack in San Luis Obispo in California.

John Sturges Trivia

In 2008 ‘University of Wisconsin Press’ published ‘Escape Artist: The Life and Films of John Sturges’, by Glenn Lovell.

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John Sturges biography timelines

  • He was born John Eliot Crane on January 3, 1910, in Oak Park, Illinois, US as the third child and second son of Reginald G. R. Carne and his wife Grace Delafield Sturges.
    3rd Jan 1910
  • The family relocated to Berkeley, California in 1923 where he attended the Berkeley High School. While at high school he participated in plays portraying characters like the King Tut’s mummy and a pilgrim.
    1923
  • Around 1930-31 he worked at the Tamalpais Theatre in San Anselmo as a stage manager to earn a living. He relocated to Los Angeles in 1931.
    1930 To 1931
  • With the help of his brother Sturges Carne, who was working as art director in the RKO Studios, Sturges joined RKO in 1932 as assistant art director in the blueprint and art departments.
    1932
  • In 1934 he helped Robert Edmond Jones to bring three-strip Technicolor at RKO and the eventual success of films like ‘The Garden of Allah’ and ‘Becky Sharp’ led to his promotion as colour consultant.
    1934
  • He then worked as an apprentice in the studio’s editing department for four years. Moving forward he stepped as second unit director of his mentor, director George Stevens’ adventure film ‘Gunga Din’ (1939) that became a huge success.
    1939
  • The films ‘They Knew What They Wanted’ (1940) and ‘Tom, Dick and Harry’ (1941) both directed by Garson Kanin saw him working as the prime editor.
    1940 To 1941
  • He directed around 45 documentary films for the U.S. Army Air Corps and intelligence that were based in California, Culver City, Dayton and Ohio during the ‘Second World War’ when he served as a Captain in the Army. The documentaries were shown to the troops and among these the most notable was ‘Thunderbolt’ (1945), a 43 minutes film that he made along with director William Wyler. This colour classic that was released in theatres after two years earned him a Bronze Star.
    1945
  • In 1945 he married Dorothy Lynn Brooks, a secretary at Warner Bros. The couple had two children, a son, Michael Eliot Sturges and a daughter, Deborah Lynn Sturges Wyle. The couple later divorced.
    1945
  • The 1953 Anscocolor western film ‘Escape from Fort Bravo’ that garnered a profit of $104,000 furthered his reputation as one of the prominent action directors of Hollywood.
    1953
  • However after being behind the camera for so many years his real breakthrough came with the 1955 classic thriller ‘Bad Day at Black Rock’ where he reteamed with Tracy. The suspense drama that also starred Robert Ryan was not only acclaimed by the critics but also proved to be a smashing success at the box office garnering a profit of $947,000. It earned three ‘Academy Awards’ nominations including that of Best Director, the only such nomination that Sturges received in his entire career.
    1955
  • He got married for a second time to Katherine Helena Soules, his fishing partner in 1984.
    1984
  • He suffered from chronic emphysema and on August 18, 1992, at the age of 82 years, he succumbed to a heart attack in San Luis Obispo in California.
    18th Aug 1992
  • In 2008 ‘University of Wisconsin Press’ published ‘Escape Artist: The Life and Films of John Sturges’, by Glenn Lovell.
    2008
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Frequently asked questions about John Sturges

  • What is John Sturges birthday?

    John Sturges was born at January 3, 1910

  • Where is John Sturges's birth place?

    John Sturges was born in Oak Park, Illinois, United States

  • What is John Sturges nationalities?

    John Sturges's nationalities is American

  • Who is John Sturges spouses?

    John Sturges's spouses is Dorothy Lynn Brooks, Katherine Helena Soules

  • Who is John Sturges's father?

    John Sturges's father is Reginald G. R. Carne

  • Who is John Sturges's mother?

    John Sturges's mother is Grace Delafield Sturges

  • What is John Sturges's sun sign?

    John Sturges is Capricorn

  • When was John Sturges died?

    John Sturges was died at August 18, 1992

  • Where was John Sturges died?

    John Sturges was died in San Luis Obispo, California, United States

  • Which age was John Sturges died?

    John Sturges was died at age 82